Case Study: Team Coaching in FMCG

Tim Akerman
Tim Akerman
Categories:   Business Support   Case Study   Change Management   Coaching and Mentoring   Consultancy   Management  
Consulting
Consulting

I was invited by a close associate to work with him at a large FMCG manufacturer where he worked to help improve team performance. This team works in central services in an extremely large multinational corporation.

I arrived at the location on a Sunday evening and in the car journey to the hotel, my client advised that he wanted to change the focus of the development. Instead of working with the full team, I was to work with a smaller sub-team. My client advised that this sub-team was having particular problems with delivering their expected objectives. My revised task was to support the sub-team to identify what help was needed to develop their skills and improve overall performance. The sub team’s role is to approve new suppliers.

I created a team development workshop overnight and we started the next day looking at the team’s behaviours and output. We quickly identified several problems

  • The process was inconsistent between team members
  • The process was also inconsistently completed between departments.
  • The team was governed through fear, carried over from a previous manager
  • There were no measures of team performance
  • The team was still working to a set of rules laid down by a former manager

The impact of these behaviours was that the staff were uncertain and working in constant fear. Failure to deliver was normal, all failures were blamed on people, and external demands were never challenged. This increased the workload in the department without adding value from the customer’s perspective. As a result, the team had become demotivated and disillusioned

I had two issues. The first was to understand and support the overall process. The second was to work with the individuals to help them improve their skills and resilience.

We employed three strategies to develop in parallel

  1. Focus on the process to identify and agree on the standard work.
  2. Work with the individuals to help them identify as a team and start collaborating
  3. Coach the individuals to enable them to understand their reactions and interact more positively

The strategies worked very well, by applying transformational coaching across the needs of the immediate client, recognising the demands of the wider organisation and the constraints individual team members perceived, we made huge step-change improvements in performance. The client (this team’s line manager) was coached to modify his behaviours to reflect the values agreed with the team. Individuals in the team were also coached to address their confidence and behavioural challenges. Working with the team, we were able to establish common values and establish the required process to enable the team to work effectively as a unit and in concert with other parts of the business. Since the process was developed by the team with support and guidance by me, they were fully engaged with the process.

After completing the intervention, the team identified that they needed to enforce the existing agreement and insist their customer, another internal department, upheld their part of the agreement. The team also stopped competing and arguing internally, focusing instead on solving problems at their root cause. The overall result was a reduction in workload and a higher quality of work product. The team also had higher engagement, morale, and created a positive and supportive working environment.

The work was so successful that further engagements were booked to deliver training and development with this team and with other teams in the business. A team build for another team in the department is planned for later in the year. I continue to coach the team director to support his development.